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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  July 27, 2010 1:05am-3:00am PST

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much. oprah: thank you, nadya, and god bless you and all your children. we'll be right back. be back. [applause] oprah: "the oprah show" is brought to you in part by target. supporting imaginative learning through free family days at museums, theaters, cultural centers, and more. closed captioning provided by the maker of the following product. pñpñ to my grandkids, i'm nana. i'm friend, secret-keeper, and playmate. do you think i'd let osteoporosis slow me down? so i asked my doctor about reclast because i heard it's the only once-a-year iv osteoporosis treatment. he told me all about it and i said that's the one for nana. he said reclast can help restrengthen my bones to help make them resistant to fracture for twelve months. and reclast is approved to help protect from fracture in more places: hip,
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spine, even other bones. [ male announcer ] you should not take reclast if you're on zometa have low blood calcium, kidney problems or you're pregnant, plan to become pregnant or nursing. take calcium and vitamin d daily. tell your doctor if you develop severe muscle bone or joint pain of if you have d as rarely jaw problems have been reported. the most common side effects include flu like symptoms fever, muscle or joint pain, headache, nausea vomiting and diarrhea. share the world with the ones you love! and ask your doctor about reclast. once-a-year reclast. year-long protection for on-the-go women. >> know the species, know the stain. you ever clean up after an alpaca? i have. it was awesome. ♪ call 1-800-steemer ♪ [ male announcer ] this is america. and this is our cheese. kraft singles. american cheese. only one nation could create it. and that nation is...america. ♪ ♪ kraft singles.
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the american cheese. [ fele announcer ] this is a strawberry pop tart. but this is warm, fresh-baked strawberry toaster strudel [ music ] see the difference? pillsbury toaster strudel, the one kids want to eat. swimming is my favorite thing. ♪ ♪ and only two things can get me out of the water. prunedoes... ♪ ♪ and totino's. ♪ we're the kids in america ♪ gñgñgñgñgñgñgño;o;yñyñyñyñyñyñyñpp@ú@ú@ú@ú@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t
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t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ them.eis no oprah: we're going gangbusters with no phone zone. we want all of america to sign the pledge, so print it out on oprah.com. go around your neighborhood, into your schools--your kids' schools, and offices, and spread the word. we want a national movement. we don't want more people to have to die because they're texting on their phones in the car. no more talking on
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the cell while driving unless yot's what we want. good-bye, everybody. [applause] [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] [ kid 1 ] waa ow so of our favorite things? we love summertime fun! ...wearing our farite colors... ...and jamming to our favorite bands! ♪ ♪ but we love eating totino's the most. we live for fun... ...friends... [ both ] ...and best of all.. [ all ] ...our favorite... ...eating totino's! ♪ we're the kids in america ♪ ♪ oh, oh, oh ♪ ♪ we're the kids in... ♪ while asleep without remembering it the next day
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women involved in a tragic traffic accident have had their lives turned upside down twice. >> once by fate, once by human error. one woman died, another survived, and we are now learning how their identities got mixed up. here's david wright. >> reporter: 19-year-old abby guerra and 21-year-old marlena cantu were driving home from disneyland last week when the left rear tire of their suv blew out and the vehicle flipped over. >> the past week has been a horrific experience. and clearly, multiple mistakes have been made. >> reporter: the family of marlena cantu was initially told their daughter was alive, but in critical condition, with brain and back injuries. they rallied to her hospital bedside in phoenix all last week. >> this last week at the hospital, with constant vigil around the clock, was very difficult. >> reporter: the family of abby guerra was told their daughter was dead. friends and family flew to phoenix this weekend for the
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funeral. then shocking news. the authorities had made a mistake. somehow they got these two women confused and realized it only saturday, six days after the accident. >> you find yourself thinking, how can this be? we have dna testing, we have excellent dental records on many people, we have x-rays and all kinds of records kept on people. >> reporter: marlena cantu was 2 inches taller, had her wisdom teeth, and crucially, a large scar on her abdomen where her appendix had been removed. >> it's a terrible mistake. >> reporter: terrible for both families. and it's not the first time. in 2006 the parents of these two girls faced a similar mixup at a different hospital. after a week of grieving, abby guerra's family has their daughter back, though still in critical condition. >> it's a miracle. but in the same you feel angry. because we've mourned all week. >> reporter: marlena cantu's family is just beginning to mourn. even though she has been dead for a week. david wright, abc news, washington.
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>> when i heard that story the thing that struck me the most is how are cantu's parents bedside and not recognizing that this was not their daughter? the answer is even sadder in that the injuries are so severe, brain injuries and back injuries so severe you can't even recognize your own daughter's face. it's just so beyond the scope of what most of us could imagine. >> no, especially as a parent to see your child in that kind of condition, i can't imagine how heartbreaking that is for both families. it's a double tragedy here. six days after the accident is when they got identified. this is a horrible story. parents of babies spending billions a year on something that is immediately trashed. >> what you didn't know about the big-money diaper industry. wcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwc
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now to the bottom line in the business of babies' bottoms. the diaper business is actually a $7 billion industry. >> with so much money at stake it is very competitive. sharyn alfonsi takes you behind the scenes at pampers. >> reporter: they are sweet.
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innocent. and at the center of one of the toughest battles in business. the diaper wars. in the u.s., the birth rate has been declining for more than a decade. with fewer new customers, the two industry giants -- pampers and huggies -- are socking it out. fighting for the precious dollars that come with diapering those precious bottoms. americans spend $7 billion worth of diapers every year. $7 billion. and the battle for those dollars has been raging for decades. >> this little baby went to market and smiled all the way home. >> reporter: this is the first diaper commercial from pampers back in 1960. >> because pampers are made with seven layers of softness. >> reporter: today, diapers are about half as bulky.
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that didn't happen by accident. diaper companies spend millions of dollars every year to try to make diapers thinner, more absorbent. we were granted access to pampers' never before seen research and development center. where over 500 scientists, chemical engineers, and seamstresses are trying to improve the look and the feel of the nappy. >> okay, i can't even say that. >> that's the analytical chromatography lab. >> okay. >> reporter: their work is surprisingly top secret. no one, not even executives like terry halley, have access to every room. here, they're working on prototypes for new diapers. they are tested for scent, touch, flexibility, and durability. >> we want to make sure that as babies, they're scooting around on their bottom, and moving, that that product stays together and stays as intended the entire wear time. >> 23.4 pounds.
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>> yeah! >> good boy. >> good job! >> reporter: and that's before they bring in the babies for realtime testing. this is called a fit and load test. >> hang on tight. >> reporter: fit to make sure they're comfortable. and then the load. >> tickle? >> reporter: those bubbles are synthetic urine. each diaper is tested for how much it can take before it leaks. which is why when dozens of mothers complained on facebook about pampers new dry max diapers, saying they gave their children extreme diaper rash and chemical burns, the folks at pampers were shocked. >> there's been no data being able to link the dry max product to any kind of skin irritation. dry max was tested on over 20,000 babies. >> reporter: the internet swirled with theories. that pampers competitors or environmentalists, who favor cloth diapers, were behind some of the accusations. and while that battle raged on, the diaper war intensified. huggies launching a little shock
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and awe. ♪ my diaper is full ♪ ♪ full of fashion ♪ >> reporter: a limited edition jean diaper. yes, jean diaper. ♪ i look like number one ♪ ♪ i poo in blue ♪ >> reporter: the commercial caused quite a buzz. >> over 1 million consumers have actually gone on to youtube where the spot is actually out there and played the commercial for themselves. >> reporter: and sales skyrocketed, up 15% almost overnight. but pampers fought back. releasing its cynthia rowley designer diapers. seems silly? the idea is to get moms so excited about a new product, they'll switch brands. and that is not easy. diaper buyers are extremely brand loyal. and it starts on day one.
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studies show if a mother is given a particular brand in the hospital, they're likely to use that brand for life. so both companies sell their diapers to hospitals at a discount hoping to hook customers early. pampers claims it now has contracts with about 95% of hospitals. to win the diaper war, companies know they have to win the hearts and minds of mommies. after all, there are billions of dollars riding on this adorable bottom line. i'm sharyn alfonsi in new york. >> you can't tell me that jeans diaper commercial is not the funniest thing you've seen in a long time. >> the tag line for that when they first launched them, and they're available through the end of this month, the coolest you'll look pooping in your pants.
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pm your #1 choice. finally this half hour, a medical milestone that has given one man a new outlook on life. he was given the world's first full-face transplant. >> incredible story here. five years ago he was accidentally shot in the face. now he's showing the world his new look. here's the bbc's fergus walsh. >> reporter: his new face is still swollen and he has yet to regain full muscle control. but for the man known only as oscar, this is a dramatic improvement. five years ago, the 31-year-old farmer accidentally shot himself
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in the face. he'd been unable to breathe or swallow. now, he's beginning to learn how to talk again. "i would like to thank all the medical team," oscar said, "the donor's family, and above all, my relatives, for supporting me until the end." the operation in march lasted 24 hours. from a donor on the left, doctors at a hospital in barcelona removed the entire face and muscles, plus the jaw, nose, cheekbones, teeth, and eyelids. along with a network of nerves and blood vessels. it was the most extensive face transplant ever carried out. doctors said oscar will need more than a year of physical therapy and should regain 90% of his facial functions. his sister said he just wanted to be normal. >> translator: a life like he had before.
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the simple fact of being able to go down the street without people looking at him in a strange way. we could have a family meal. we can all be together. >> reporter: frenchwoman isabelle dinoire was the first person to receive a partial face transplant five years ago. since then, ten more patients worldwide have received new faces. all with the ambitions of returning to a normal life. fergus walsh, bbc news. >> unbelievable. >> it really is. they're saying the good news is a week after the operation he had to shave because his beard was actually growing. they mentioned isabelle dinoire. i think when you saw her face you probably remember her. if we have a picture we're going to show you. this is what she looked like on the left right after the surgery. she looks fantastic now. >> she healed really nice. modern medicine blows my mind, especially with this kind of stuff. look at, that complete face transplants, unbelievable. >> the nice thing is you can see she's regained a lot of that
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muscular ability to control. initially after the transplant 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online bombshell. who's accused of sharing american war secrets and an inside look at the website that posted them. then, mistaken identity. two accident victims and one huge mistake by a hospital and a medical examiner. how did it happen? and, dangerous dengue fever. >> some people who have had it say your bones feel like they're made of glass. >> the new threat from mosquitos. it's tuesday, july 27th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> we haven't even heard of dengue fever in something like 70 years. but there is apparently an epidemic right now in the caribbean and central america, and of course with anything
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there's always a fear these mosquitos could spread. people are really on the look again. >> spray, man, spray, that time of year, stay safe. >> be hot and sticky all at once right now. good morning and thanks for being with us on this tuesday. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm rob nelson. that stunning leak of secret military documents is now challenging support for what is now the longest war in u.s. history. >> the white house says the documents reveal nothing new while the man who published them says they show clear proof of war crimes. t.j. winick has the latest this morning from washington. t.j.? >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the documents come to light at a time when the congress and the public have some pretty serious doubts about the war. it is being called one of the biggest intelligence breaches in u.s. history. 92,000 leaked reports, six years of classified records, depicting details about missions gone horribly wrong, civilian deaths, and being double-crossed by our alleged ally the pakistani
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government. >> it poses a very real and potential threat to those that are working hard every day to keep us safe. >> reporter: in fact, the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism, but there are 180 dispatches, some offering strong details, that pakistani's military intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. now, the revelations were first posted on wikileaks, a whistle blower website. it was fed the information from a source believed to be this man, army specialist brad manning, now behind bars in kuwait accused of document theft. disillusioned about the war, manning struck up an online friendship with a sacramento, california, computer hacker. he told the hacker he discovered incredible, awful things that belonged in the public domain and not on some server stored in a dark room in washington, d.c. realizing the magnitude of the situation, the hacker then decided to turn manning in to authorities. >> had i not acted i would have wondered for the rest of my
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life, did i get somebody killed? >> reporter: manning told the hacker he downloaded the classified information onto cds which previously had music by artists such as lady gaga burned onto them. rob and vinita? >> thanks, t.j. and our coverage of the leaked war documents will continue later this morning. we'll take you live to washington on "america this morning." we'll look at the backlash on "good morning america" and get insight on the website that posted the secrets later during this half hour. bp is confirming this morning tony hayward will step down as bp's chief executive in october. >> and robert dudley, who grew up along the gulf coast, will replace him. diana alvear is in buras, louisiana, with reaction >> reporter: rob and vinita, good morning. hayward's departure shows that bp is serious about turning the page on what has become a public relatisas most importantly, their new man on the job is american. after oil began gushing into the gulf, the end may be in sight.
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retired admiral thad allen said they have two priorities. >> first w to pumping mud and cement down the top of the well. what we call the static kill. >> reporter: within weeks the launch "operation bottom kill," relief wells will be drilled to permanently seal the damaged well. what has proven to be a bigger challenge is finding the oil. much of it has dispersed beneath the water, keeping skimmer boats docked. >> some of these patches are only sheen at this point. it becomes very weathered. sometimes it's not skimmable. >> reporter: the progress in killing the well has been accompanied by a change in command at bp. embattled ceo tony hayward will be reassigned to russia. his replacement, gulf coast native bob dudley. the two men could not be more different. hayward's comments have set off a firestorm of criticism. >> no one wants this thing over more than i do. i'd like my life back. >> reporter: dudley seems to have struck a much more conciliatory tone. >> i thinksd
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lot better. >>eport's loc gulf officials say is a good first step in turning bp's image around. >> he did come down and stick i saw compassio i saw a guy that cared. i've got to give him the benefit of the doubt. >> reporter: cleanup crews are faced with a different kind of challenge now, finding the oil. a lot of it has broken down and has sunk beneath the rf the that is going to make it very difficult foem t from washing as vinita, r >> all right, thank you. in otherw, c corruption trial have hit a snag after a clash between the judge and the defense. an attorney for the former i oveged judoverthand cansy ing argument. the judge then threatened to hold him in contempt. the lawyer says he'll defy the judge and insists he is willing to go to jail. two arizona families have finally learned how a tragic mix-up took place. their daughters were friends involved in a terrible car
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accident. >> officials told them one of yun dea other alive a week later, a heartbreaking don guevara has the lat don? >> reporter: rob and vinita, the investigation is under way to find out how this mix- happened. officials in arizona say at first, they were unable to identify the body of marlene cantu, who died in last week's car crash near phoenix. her body was taken to the medical examiner's office. at the hospital, information from the family led officials there to believe the person transported was cantu. they were wrong. her friend abby guerra is the one who survived. >> let me send to the families our sincere apologies. >> reporter: saturday the families learned of the tragic mix-up. cantu's father sat silently as his girlfriend expressed his family's grief. >> the past week has been a horrific experience, and clearly multiple mistakes have been made. >> reporter: the money her friends raised at a car wash over the weekend will now be split.
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some going towards cantu's burial, the rest towards guerra's medical expenses. we're still in shock. i mean, there's not -- i mean, this wasn't something we ever expected, you know, as well as i'm probably thinking the other family too. >> we know this is an extraordinarily challenging situation. and our hearts and our prayers go out to both families. >> reporter: in phoenix, guerra's family hopes the mistake will never happen again. >> everyone identified, everybody that came in, said that's who it was. you know. there's really no good excuse. >> reporter: but abby still isn't out of the clear. she was taken to the hospital in critical condition. she has a broken back, a brain injury, and a collapsed lung. in los angeles, don guevara. rob, vinita, back to you. two russian astronauts are taking a walk this morning outside the international space station. they're basically the outer space version of tv repairmen. the astronauts are replacing a video camera and improving cable connections to the lab's newest
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module. one crew member remarked on the beauty outside the space station. and now a look at your weather across the country. severe storms with a threat of tornados from the dakotas to peran. thunderstorms likely froa toharln heavy rain in the sout and central rockies. >> phoenix climbs to 105. 80s from seattle to sacramento. 92sas 90 in chica the entire east coast hovers around the 90 degree mark today. the tampa bay rays are now on the right s history. >> 26-year-old tamp his team's first no-hitter last night defeating the detroit tigers 5-0. this was the fifth no-hitter thrown this season. ironically, two of them were thrown against the rays. they've got to feel bad about themselves. >> switching the script. garza threw 120 pitches and walked only one player. he says it's one of those days where everything just lined up. stay with us. woman (laughing): i want to make sure my grandkids get to see these old
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we return now to our top story this morning. the 92,000 classified military documents leaked to the website wikileaks. >> while this is one of the largest intelligence leaks in the country's history, for the website's founder, just business as usual. jim sciutto reports from london. >> reporter: its mission is taking on the powerful and seemingly untouchable and exposing their biggest secrets. so when we sat down in london with wikileaks' founder julian assange and asked what drives him, his answer was direct. >> i'm a combative person so i like crushing bastards. >> is crushing bastards in its own right a just cause? >> depends on the bastards. real bastards are people who have power and abuse their power to afflict people who are weaker than they are.
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>> reporter: the "bastards" are the architects of the war in afghanistan. wikileaks released 92,000 classified military reports spanning six years, exposing afghan government corruption. pakistani support for the taliban. and most alarmingly, what assange says is evidence of possible war crimes by u.s. soldiers. >> it's pretty clear that at least some of these are war crimes. >> what do you say to those who say military leaders, government leaders, that you've just handed the taliban their biggest propaganda victory? >> well, not so. people who commit war crimes or similarly abusive actions, they hand the enemy propaganda victories. >> reporter: the documents caused a storm in washington. to opponents of the war, further cause for withdrawal. to the white house, outright dangerous.
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>> it, besides being against the law, has the potential to be very harmful to those that are in our military, those that are cooperating with our military, and those that are working to keep us safe. >> reporter: wikileaks has made a habit of ignoring warnings just like that, chalking up a long list of intelligence coups since it was launched just three and a half years ago by a global mix of dissidents, journalists, and technology whizzes. what's incredible is it's done it all with no paid staff, no headquarters, no home. it's less an organization than a movement. still, it's the u.s. that's been one of its biggest targets. earlier this year, wikileaks published this video of a deadly american helicopter attack in baghdad in 2007. 12 people were killed, including two journalists from reuters. three weeks ago, a u.s. soldier in iraq named bradley manning was charged with leaking the video.
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now some believe manning could have been the source as well. but in keeping with wikileaks' policy of protecting sources' anonymity, assange refused to say. do you deny manning is the source of the material? >> we don't know who the source of the material is. if those allegations are true, then of course the man is a hero. >> reporter: the danger is you pick so many powerful targets and you become a target yourself. so, assange lives on the road. a life that suits him, he says. his family moved constantly as a child. and he's run into trouble himself. convicted of computer hacking in australia in 1995. wikileaks itself doesn't have a home either, located on more than 20 internet servers with hundreds of domain names, making it virtually impossible -- and this is the key -- for government censors to shut it down. clearly you've gotten under some very powerful people's skin, right? that goes for individuals,
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organizations, countries. china. australia. >> yes. >> hometown. trying to censor you. >> iran. >> does that give you satisfaction? to know that you've got under the skin? does it prove that you're doing something good, in effect? >> not necessarily. but it's a good signal that maybe, people are taking notice. >> reporter: taking notice and taking aim at the man and the website dedicated to a future with no secrets. i'm jim sciutto in london. >> he certainly stands behind what he does. >> absolutely. and this is not the first time they've put inflammatory stuff online. they've taken on the church of scientology, they've taken on the detention center at guantanamo bay, also the iraq war. this is not the first time they have kind of posted some classified information up on their website. >> another one that got media attention was when they posted the yahoo! account of sarah palin in the 2010 election,
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basically showing she might have violated some public disclosure laws by sending private e-mails on public e-mail websites. >> i'm sure traffic's up on that site. when we return it's time for your "skinny." paris hilton's antics and wh oprah: sarah jessica parker. >> ah! oprah: susan sarandon. >> yes! oprah: meryl streep. brooke sheilds. lisa kudrow. and emmitt smith. >> it was strong. it was a strong feeling. oprararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararararara 1x1xntntnt
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> we haven't heard from paris hilton for a while now in "the skinny." >> she's back. >> lindsay has taken her spotlight but she is back. she's actually been doing some hard partying with her sister nicky around the world. >> shocking. >> she's on a yacht sunday night and some pictures are taken. before i tell you anything about the pictures take a look at what's going on and i'll tell you what people are alleging right now. they're calling this the jesse james.
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apparently that is the new way to reference pictures where it looks like you might be simulating a salute. basically as though she is doing a nazi salute. again, this picture was snapped on sunday night. her people are out adamantly denying it. they're saying paris was dancing and having fun with her arms up in the air, she went to scratch her upper lip, that's when the picture was taken. people love anything paris-related. >> of course. >> they also went on to say the hat is not a communist hat, it was a military-style hat from a club. they say half her family is jewish, many of her friends are as well, so they are adamantly denying all of this. i have to agree. >> she could have been waving, she could have been doing anything, who knows. kind of unfair. i don't think paris hilton -- anyway. >> she just likes to party, just likes to dance. >> like a normal billionaire heir. thanks, willis. you know i have a crush on kim kardashian. you've scolded me -- >> you and half the world. >> no kidding. there's always been speculation
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on what she's had done, the work, parts of her body, all this kind of stuff. apparently she does have a heart here. apparently a fan of kim's was on twitter and posted, i'm getting head to toe plastic surgery next week to look like kim kardashian so my husband won't leave me, he worships her. kim writes back quickly and says that, please don't, your husband should love you for who you are, don't try to be somebody else, i'm sure you're beautiful inside and out just as you are. that's the kind of woman wants to replicate kim kardashian just to keep her husband, that's kind of sad. kim kind of talked her out of and it kind of gave her reasonable advice for unreasonable action there. kim admitted her nose is her biggest insecurity. >> she has also said she has had botox but i don't consider that to be plastic surgery. >> no. >> when i get it, you can't say that i've had plastic surgery. >> you don't need the botox. i think she's a gorgeous woman. but you know how i feel about k.k. >> and the family. >> even mom looks good.
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>> beautiful genes. so one of the "housewives," believe it or not, is apparently in real financial trouble. if you watch "the real housewives of new jersey" it's probably the least one you would suspect. it's teresa. she's always going on and on about how much the family is spending. >> i've got a $5 million house in patterson! >> that's pretty good. she is faced with $11 million in debt. it's so bad they have now filed for chapter 7 bankruptcy. they filed back in june. they're having a big auction for the highest bidder. it's all going to take place in their 16-room, 10,000 square foot house that's worth -- >> $5 million in patton. >> that's right, exactly. they say it's going to be everything. a grand piano, two flat screen tvs, a steel snowplow, suit of armor. i think the list gives you an idea of what these people were spending recklessly on. >> the thing is -- jersey is my home state. the reason -- there was a big blowup on the show recently, it was bad. the thing that set it off was
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another woman on the show, danielle, accusing her, the house is in foreclosure, she denies it, kind of went nuts, now it all turns out to be true. big financial problems. >> how do you get $11 million in debt? at little to no cost to you. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your mobility and your life. / one medicare benefit that, with private insurance / may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ... great news. / your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts. and that means the scooter store is your best shot at qualifying for a scooter that costs you little to nothing. hi i'm doug harrison. at the scooter store, 97% of our medicare customers / pay little to nothing out of pocket. how do we do it? we know what it takes to get you your
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febreze eliminates odors and leaves a light fresh scent. whoa. it's a breath of fresh air. here are some stories to watch today on abc news. oregon investigators may release new details about the disappearance of kyron horman this evening. the 7-year-old's father believes the boy's stepmother is still involved. the gulf oil disaster will be discussed in detail today on capitol hill. the spill's environmental and economic impact will be the topic at four congressional hearings. wall street investors will be watching for new reports on consumer confidence and real estate prices today. that's after a 100-point gain yesterday from the dow. finally this half hour, a mystery for public health investigators down in florida after reports of a rare disease spread by mosquitos. >> 40 people have had symptoms of dengue fever, an illness not seen in about 70 years. jeffrey kofman reports from key
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west. >> reporter: usually they are just annoying pests. in key west mosquitos have suddenly taken on an added menace. because some are spreading dengue fever. >> symptoms are like flu on steroids. you'll feel very, very bad, your joints will hurt severely, you'll have headache behind your eyes, you may have a rash. >> reporter: the world health organization estimates there may be as many as 50 million cases of dengue every year. more than 70% in asia. but it's the more than 10,000 cases this year in the caribbean that are of concern to authorities in the u.s. at least 32 people have died so far in the dominican republic and puerto rico. the 18 cases in key west this year hardly constitute an epidemic, and there have been no serious illnesses. there has also been no panic. >> business is doing okay. a little slow with the oil. so far we're doing okay. >> reporter: but precautions are being taken. standing water is being cleared. fumigation is under way. >> dengue fever is not even on
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the top 100 list of my concerns. >> reporter: photographer robert clark knows why people fear the disease. he was infected with dengue while on assignment in cambodia. >> i was sore, my joints felt really swollen. i felt like i'd aged. >> reporter: there are several strains. it's usually not fatal and often mild. but when it hits hard, it hurts. >> some people who have had it say your bones feel like they're made of glass. apparently it's one of the most painful set of symptoms that people can endure. >> reporter: one more reason to swat those annoying mosquitos. jeffrey kofman, abc news, miami. >> we're both itchy after that story. coming from louisiana, the big deal at the time was west nile virus. this sounds a little more severe than what that situation was. they do offer some interesting advice. they say you should not swat a mosquito with one hand, it pushes air down and shoos the mosquito away, creates a vacuum. you should, when you can, a to do the clap, catch them from
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both sides. >> catch it before it's on you.
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! roa a war secrets posted online. the stunning revelations, who may be to blame, and the widespread impact. then, crisis management. the historic oil spill and bp's decision to send its chief executive far away from the gulf. and, survival story. the brain injury that could have killed a toddler. >> a lot of people say a miracle. yes, it is. >> and the medical team who saved him. it's tuesday, july 27th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> definitely incredible medical stories this morning. that's another one about this little boy in north carolina. literally a hook in his head and survived it and may be totally
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fine. >> it's hard to watch, hard to see those x-rays. >> good morning. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm vinita nair. the biggest leak of military secrets in u.s. history reveals stunning details about the afghanistan war. >> the leak presents an extraordinary look at the war but threatens to undermine the military's goals. here's martha raddatz. >> reporter: the leaked records give precise accounts of missions gone horribly wrong. helicopters shot down and supposed allies, the pakistanis, playing a deadly double-cross with the americans. no wonder the leaks have created a firestorm in washington. >> there are names, there are operations, there's logistics. it poses a very real and potential threat. >> reporter: perhaps the most damning reports concern pakistan. just last week, hillary clinton called pakistan a partner. the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism. but there are 180 dispatches here, some offering strong detail that pakistan's military
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intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. in another one, an official from the cia's counterterrorism center says two religious schools, or madrassas, near peshawar, pakistan, are providing 95% of suicide attackers. the cia adds this chilling detail. every month, the former chief of isi, general hamid gul, is visiting one of the madrassas. there is also horrifying detail about civilian deaths in 2007. five ground-launched american rockets destroy a compound where it is believed a senior al qaeda commander is staying. the army delta force arrives to find seven children killed by the rockets and no al qaeda commander.
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there is a strong warning to anyone reading the secret report not to share the information with anyone outside the united states, saying the rocket strike must be kept protected. and one of the more ominous reports says the taliban may have shot down a u.s. helicopter in 2007, with a shoulder-fired missile. martha raddatz, abc news, washington. speculation about who stole the documents is now focusing on a 22-year-old army private. bradley manning was an intelligence analyst based in iraq. he chatted online with a former hacker, saying he had downloaded thousands of secret documents by copying them onto music cds. the hacker became alarmed and went to authorities. manning was arrested and charged earlier this month with leaking classified data. the u.s. navy man killed by the taliban has now been identified by family members as justin mcneely. mcneely's father sent an e-mail to colleagues confirming the death of his 30-year-old son. the taliban claimed it killed
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mcneely and captured another sailor in southern afghanistan last week. mcneely's also the nephew of a state lawmaker in colorado. bp is confirming a big change in top management this morning after the boards of directors meeting in london. >> the company's also selling off assets to raise money. lama hasan is joining us from london with the latest details. lama? >> reporter: good morning, rob. good morning, vinita. you're absolutely right, bp has had its board meeting this morning and he is on his way out. after 28 years with bp, tony hayward's tenure is coming to an end. and on october 1st he'll be taking a job with bp's joint venture in russia. as you said, bp is planning to sell $30 billion worth of assets. now, he's really been the face of this oil spill. he's been nicknamed captain clueless for the way he handled or mishandled the oil slick disaster. it's also been a pr disaster for the company. you'll recall that he said he wanted his life back. that the gulf of mexico is one
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big ocean following the leak. and just weeks after the spill, hayward was captured on his yacht as the oil continued to spread across the gulf. for the oil giant bp, it was the right choice to let him go. >> there was a lot of blood in the water and the sharks were clearly circling. and he was ripped apart during these past few weeks. >> i think we can always do a lot better. everybody can be doing better here. so, we're going to be working. >> reporter: bob dudley from mississippi is the man who will be taking over from hayward. he will be the first american in the company's history to take that position. he's already in charge of the cleanup operation. now, according to bp, dudley has "a deep appreciation and affinity" of the gulf coast. as for the oil slick that has devastated the gulf of mexico for months now and has affected its residents, there is some welcome news, there is some respite. on day 99 of the spill, the spill appears to be shrinking. but it's really the lives of the
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people who have been affected there that is going to take some time to rebuild and it's going to be a difficult task for them to do that. rob, vinita? >> lama hasan live in london, thank you. the father of a missing oregon boy is stepping up his legal battle with the child's stepmother. kyron horman's father wants his soon to be ex-wife to help pay his legal fees. he claims he is entitled to half of any money she may have. the father believes the stepmother is involved in kyron's disappearance last month though police have not declared her a suspect. we've learned this morning that oregon police have questioned former vice president al gore about allegations that he sexually abused a massage therapist. a law enforcement source confirms to portland's abc affiliate that detectives interviewed gore in san francisco on thursday. after dropping the case earlier this year, police recently reopened their investigation. gore, meanwhile, has denied the accusations.
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closing arguments in the rod blagojevich corruption trial could continue today unless the judge sends one of the defense lawyers to jail. an attorney for the former illinois governor argued with the judge over what he can and cannot say in his closing argument. the judge then threatened to hold him in contempt. the lawyer insists saying he will defy the judge's order. the southern california town of bell plans to cut the sky-high salaries paid to its city leaders. bell city council members vowed to slash their owns $100,000 a year salaries by 90%. a scandal erupted after reports revealed the city's manager's annual salary was nearly $800,000. the california attorney general has now launched an investigation. >> $800,000, not a bad payday. >> get a job out there. here's a look at your tuesday forecast. 80-mile-an-hour winds, golf ball-sized hail, flash floods. isolated tornadoes from the dakotas to upper michigan. thunderstorms from central texas across the mississippi valley, gulf coast and southeast.
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heavy rain and flooding in arizona and new mexico. >> 86 in albuquerque. 95 in boise and 80 in seattle. 90s from the twin cities to dallas. 90 here in new york. 91 in atlanta. 93 in miami. they are barely old enough to get behind the wheel but that did not stop them from hitting the road for 800 miles, driven solely by the sun. >> high school students from across the country trekked from dallas to boulder, colorado, in solar-powered cars they built themselves. 13 teams competed in an annual challenge through engineering and fund-raising. >> the cars only go about 35 miles an hour and that is why it took them about eight days to reach their destination. >> good for those kids. >> you have to wonder when they're driving behind the wheels if people are running to get out of the way. a young person driving a crazy car! >> like when you see that student driver sign on the car, everyone tends to flee, right? we'll be right back with more "world news now."
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an incredible story here.
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a north carolina toddler managed to survive after a metal hook punctured his head and got lodged in the back of his brain. >> thanks to quick-thinking family members and medical teams and plenty of luck, relatives are calling the boy miracle baby. here's wtvd's tamara gibbs. >> reporter: bright-eyed and alert, josiah jackson is your typical toddler. >> we was just sitting in a chair, laughing and playing. >> reporter: a week ago, his child-like curiosity nearly cost him his life. >> next thing i know before i could react the chair was going backward. >> reporter: the 17-month-old fell onto of a pressure washer. the l-shaped hook seen in this x-ray is lodged two to three inches inside the brain. one of the worst impalements his surgeon had ever seen. >> this story really had two possible outcomes. one is very good. one is very bad. >> reporter: josiah's wound was near the largest blood vessel in the brain. that's why neurosurgeon germanwala credits the medical
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care josiah received before he even arrived at unc hospitals. >> everyone worked together. you know, nobody gave up hope. everybody knew it was serious. >> reporter: as it turns out, josiah's uncle carlton has emt training. so does his aunt. and their neighbor is a rescue squad volunteer who happened to have a saw capable of cutting the power washer. >> that's god working with you. >> reporter: still, it was touch and go before and after josiah's risky surgery. >> and he didn't sugarcoat anything. he said, mr. jones, more than likely we pull the screw out of his head, he's going to plead out and bleed to death. >> reporter: even dr. germanwala had to admit there was a chance this little boy wouldn't survive. >> losing one or two ounces of blood in an adult is often no problem. in a 17-month-old, that makes a huge difference. >> reporter: it's a happy ending to this toddler's terrible tumble. in fact, he's going home.
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and he had a little incentive to get better. >> i whispered in his ear when he was asleep, when you get back, i don't care what grandma say. he kind of like opened his eyes. >> reporter: wide-open eyes, josiah's doctor and family can't get enough of. >> in this particular case, i think we had a lot of help from above. >> a lot of people say a miracle. yes, he is. he's a blessed baby. >> reporter: in chapel hill, tamara gibbs reporting for abc news. >> wow. and two points here. one, they did some follow-up exams and they don't think there will be any long-term damage, which is incredible. two, shoutout to the doctors at unc hospitals, my alma mater, unc chapel hill. good folks down there in chapel hill. >> incredible story. they keep calling him a miracle baby. kind of a miracle family. if you want to hear more they are going to be, josiah along with his grandparents and
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impressive surgeon, they're all going to be on "good m
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zac efron, whom vinita just called dreamy, has been called many things else. actor, dancer, heartthrob, even hollywood's next big star. >> now i'm being called cougar. from the hair to the good looks, the starlet girlfriend, he seems to have it all. neal karlinsky caught up with the 22-year-old who is looking to the future. >> 22. >> i know. >> reporter: at the mall of america they're lined up to see a man caught somewhere between squeaky clean tween fantasy teenage heartthrob, and full-on sex symbol. he is 22-year-old zac efron. and if you don't know who he is, just ask a teenage girl. they fell for him and his singing and dancing in "high school musical." but if you think zac efron is
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just a fancy footed tween dream, he is working hard to prove you wrong. with his starring role in the new film "charlie st. cloud," the young man with the perfect smile is showing off his acting chops. no dancing, but plenty of raw emotion. >> that's my brother! >> reporter: as a man racked with guilt for surviving a car crash that killed his little brother. >> meet here. every day. >> promise? >> i promise. >> was it hard for you to bare all? to be emotional? >> no, it was fun. it was fun. i read the script, i recognized this was a brand-new challenge. >> crying on command for a lot of us, difficult to do. >> it's not so much crying on command. that's not how you really think about it.
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it was really easy for me to put my little brother, picture him if the scenarios. and how it would have made me feel. >> reporter: the film was a strategic choice for a young actor trying to navigate hollywood's sometimes treacherous waters. >> i want to put in the work, i want to be taken out of my own, i want to be challenged in a new way. >> reporter: he started acting at age 12. just like the characters on tv's "glee" -- ♪ it's my life it's now or never ♪ >> reporter: efron says he was a theater geek. >> one day i was walking around school, some guy i used to play basketball with goes, oh, hey, there goes the theater dork. i'm like, yeah, that's right. here i am, i'm the theater dork. >> reporter: his mother made the three-hour drive from the family's california home to hollywood so he could audition and eventually land bit parts on shows like "e.r." and "summerland." >> are you close with your family? >> i have to keep them close. they're the ones that keep me grounded. family's all you have.
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they tell it to me straight. >> reporter: he wants to be taken seriously as an actor but is aware his looks haven't exactly hurt him. you get a hard time about that? your brother give you a hard time? >> i don't know -- yeah, of course, dude, it's the worst. >> this is the worst? >> no, it's -- no, it's not the worst. every once in a while you walk into people's houses and that's on their kitchen counter. there's always an awkward moment where they realize that you've seen it. you're just like -- i flip it over. >> you're blushing slightly. >> i am, yeah. i don't know. you're holding the magazine. >> reporter: though he embraces his tween fans he has a sense of humor about it all. >> i kissed him! >> reporter: even poked fun at his own fame recently on "saturday night live." >> let's face it, tweens. i owe you big-time. if it weren't for you, i'd just be some random college student. instead of a college-age man pretending to be a high school student. >> reporter: efron is careful.
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careful choosing his next move with a near-constant following from the paparazzi. and careful in his relationships. he met actress vanessa hudgens on-set during "high school musical" and the two are still together. you're dating the same woman for years, and you're a hot property. >> we've got a great thing going. it's serving me right now. we're having a lot of fun. it's not over yet, i'm not going to speak too far down the road because i don't know what's going to happen, but right now i'm very happy. >> reporter: he's happy with his new movie too. and says he won't pick his next paycheck. he wants to become a serious hollywood talent and says he's willing to wait and willing to work to make that happen. i'm neal karlinsky in los angeles. >> you all right? >> i will say, like everyone else, i did think, oh, this
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kid's just about the hair. then i saw "17 again." he is actually a really good actor. that new movie "charlie st. cloud" comes out this friday. i'll be there, i love you, zac. >> he's trying to model his career off leonardo dicaprio. with lunesta. lunesta is thought to interact with gaba receptors associated with sleep. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. lunesta has some risk of dependency. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a co-pay as low as
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"world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> if you watched the "papers" segment yesterday you heard me saying i was so proud of this young indian kid because he'd done the most pushups. >> and today? >> rob picked this purposely to spite me. there's an indian guy who has a new world record, you see it right there, longest ear hair. >> oh! oh, man. >> yeah, that sucker is 10 inches on one side and 10 inches on the other. in his defense, he believes this to be a symbol of luck and prosperity. he says he's been growing this since he was 18, has never cut it. in fact, he even goes the extra
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step of never wearing rings because he doesn't want to accidentally pull any of it out. he is married and the wife was constantly saying, cut it, cut it, then he won the guinness book of world records and she's like, okay, keep it. >> she wakes up every morning and looks at him and that ear hair is on that pillow? >> that's not nice. >> everyone makes choices in life -- >> tomorrow can we have a nice indian story? a spelling bee story? >> there's plenty of those. >> something like that. >> the next story -- i did do that story in retaliation. i thought it was funny. i'm an unapologetic, huge m.j. fan, michael jackson. i don't have much information on this funny video, moon walking through the walmart for no apparent reason. i guess he was bored or found a really good deal on some underwear. he was at walmart. just for fun. not much to say, just doing it. >> do we have any idea how someone captured this? they must have seen him going
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from aisle to aisle. >> he was putting on a show for the good folks there at walmart. >> i like to see things like that, or traffic cops that get into it and start dancing. it's always nice when you see someone who's actually happy out there, anywhere in life. take a look at this. this happened on interstate 495 in boston, south -- i shouldn't tell you where because i don't know where these places are. three shetland ponies decided to take a stroll along the highway. just out there i guess grazing. i'm not really sure exactly what they were doing. the trio somehow managed to open a back gate, they headed straight for the highway, they stopped a bunch of traffic. as you can imagine, a lot of difficulty -- shetland ponies, their build is fascinating. i've always been fascinated by that breed. >> my little pony. look at that. 30 seconds left, you and i are going to leave the show and take a road trip to bishop, texas. >> another place i don't know where that is. >> you're from dallas, too. bishop, texas, somewhere in your home state. this woman, joan guinther, won for the fourth time the lottery in texas. last month she won $10 million.
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she's won $21 million with four winning tickets but she
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secrets revealed. classified war documents and who's accused of revealing them. >> i'm looking forward to my meeting with the defense minister. we have a lot to talk about. >> the fallout and the investigation. then, disappearing damage. the gulf oil slick appears smaller. but environmental fears still lurk. and, new face. one man's outlook after surgery that made history. it's tuesday, july 27th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> that last story literally is like that movie "face/off" with nicolas cage and john travolta. it's just like that, incredible
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what they've allowed this guy to do again. >> and they are saying that the good news for this guy is 90% of that facial movement and sensation, all of that should be restored. so even though right now it's obviously in the very early stages of removing someone else's face, it's going to get really good for him. >> amazing what medicine can do. wow. good morning, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm vinita nair. that huge leak of secret military documents is undermining a war effort already under intense pressure. >> casualties are soaring while a major offensive in southern afghanistan is on hold. now allegations of u.s. war crimes from the man who first published the documents online. t.j. winick has the latest now from washington. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the documents come to light at a time when the public and congress have some serious doubts about the war.
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it is being called one of the biggest intelligence breaches in u.s. history. 92,000 leaked reports, six years of classified records, depicting details about missions gone horribly wrong, civilian deaths, and being double-crossed by our alleged ally the pakistani government. >> it poses a very real and potential threat to those that are working hard every day to keep us safe. >> reporter: the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism. but there are 180 dispatches, some offering strong detail, that pakistan's military intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. >> i'm looking forward to my meeting with the defense minister. we have a lot to talk about. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton dodged a question about the revelations, first posted on wikileaks, a whistleblower website. it was fed the information from
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a source believed to be this man, army specialist brad manning, now behind bars in kuwait, accused of document theft. disillusioned about the war, manning struck up an online friendship with a sacramento, california, computer hacker. he told the hacker he discovered incredible, awful things and not on some server stored in a dark room in washington, d.c. realizing the magnitude of the situation, the hacker decided to turn manning in to authorities. >> had i not acted i would have wondered for the rest of my life, did i get somebody killed? >> reporter: manning told the hacker he downloaded the classified information onto cds which previously had music by artists such as lady gaga burned onto them. rob and vinita? >> will the leaked documents change the political or military course? the first test may come this week when the house of representatives votes on a war funding bill. we asked chief political correspondent george stephanopoulos if the leak will change the outcome. >> it will be a tough vote. it always is going to be a tough vote. but this alone, this leak alone is not going to change the
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course of that vote. the president is going to get the funding for now. but this leak does reinforce the doubts that a lot of democrats and even some republicans have now about the course of this war. this is an unpopular war. it is losing support. there are real questions about whether it's winnable and how long the public will support them. these documents reinforce those doubts. >> president obama has scheduled his next war strategy review for the end of the year. for now white house officials stress the war in afghanistan is a matter of nal sy. mcneely. his father is a deputy fire marshal in california. he sent an e-mail to colleagues confirming the death of his 30-year-old son. the taliban claimed it killed mcneely and captured another sailor in southern afghanistan last week. we are learning more about bp's plans to replace ceo tony hayward this morning. the embattled chief will leave the top spot in october and tk
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e nss i eicart dey. smon betsp o the numbered. >> there was a lot of blood in the water and the sharks were circling. and he was ripped apart during these past few weeks. >> i think we can always do a lot better. everybody can do a little better here. so we're going to be working. >> bp's earnings report today sheds light on the company's cost to clean up the gulf. analysts say it could be as high as $30 billion. it is now day 99 of that spill. the worst in the country's histo but there is progress and m of that oihly disappeared. reom buras, louis >> reporter: for 86 days, oil spewed into the gulf. perhaps 200 million gallons of it. so where is it? >> i think it's underneath the water. you know, it's in between the bottom and the top of the water. >> reporter: shrimper salvador cipriano has been laying out boom with his boat. but he says there's no oil to
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catch. is there much oil in the marshes? >> no, no, there's not really a whole lot right now. >> reporter: it's becoming increasingly hard to find the oil. we surveyed the marshes and saw none. in a flight to the rig site with the coast guard, there was no oil to be seen. >> it's becoming a very elusive bunch of oil for us to find and do anything about. >> reporter: two weeks ago, skimmers picked up about 25,000 barrels of oily water in one day. last thursday, they picked up a total of just 200 barrels. that doesn't mean all that oil is gone. there are thousands of small patches like this below the surface. but experts say an astonishing amount has disappeared. here's why. the light crude began to deteriorate the moment it escaped at high pressure. then it was zapped with dispersant. the oil that made it to the surface was broken up by 88-degree water and baked by 100-degree sun and whipped apart
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by wind and waves. and so, according to experts, much of it was reabsorbed into the environment. >> mother nature is doing what she's supposed to do, and we're 700 skimmers on call, but in recent days there has not been a lot to skim. national incident commander thad allen says the kill of the well will begin next monday, and that well should be cemented shut once and for all by saturday, august 7th. jeffrey kofman, abc news, buras, louisiana. with flood damage estimates approaching $40 million, the state of wisconsin will be asking for federal disaster aid. last week's rains devastated milwaukee and surrounding areas. with floodwaters receding, streets are littered with tons of debris. so far, more than 10,000 homes have been damaged or destroyed. here is a look at your tuesday forecast. severe storms from south dakota to michigan. gusty winds, hail and isolated tornados in green bay, minneapolis, and duluth. thunderstorms and downpours from texas into the southeast. flooding in arizona and new
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mexico with thunderstorms in the central rockies. >> 90s in colorado springs, salt lake city, and boise. 82 in fargo. 95 in omaha. 88 in detfo how do you get 5 million pounds of steel upnew hudson riverer, cafcf1 50-efabd an to the south bronx. >> the bridge project is costing the city more than $600 million. it is scheduled to open to traffic this fall. >> willis, it's named after you, willis avenue bridge. >> that's it, baby. >> we'll be right back with more "world news now." the families of two young hó
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traffic accident have had their lives turned upside down twice. >> once by fate, once by human error. one woman died, another survived, and we are now learning how their identities got mixed up. here's david wright. >> reporter: 19-year-old abby guerra and 21-year-old marlena cantu were driving home from disneyland last week when the left rear tire of their suv blew out and the vehicle flipped over. >> the past week has been a horrific experience. and clearly, multiple mistakes have been made. >> reporter: the family of marlena cantu was initially told their daughter was alive, but in critical condition, with brain and back injuries. they rallied to her hospital bedside in phoenix all last week. >> this last week at the hospital, with constant vigil around the clock, was very
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difficult. >> reporter: the family of abby guerra was told their daughter was dead. friends and family flew to phoenix this weekend for the funeral. then shocking news. the authorities had made a mistake. somehow they got these two women confused and realized it only saturday, six days after the accident. >> you find yourself thinking, how can this be? we have dna testing, we have excellent dental records on many people, we have x-rays and all kinds of records kept on people. >> reporter: marlena cantu was 2 inches taller, had her wisdom teeth, and crucially, a large scar on her abdomen where her appendix had been removed. >> it's a terrible mistake. >> reporter: terrible for both families. and it's not the first time. in 2006 the parents of these two girls faced a similar mixup at a different hospital. after a week of grieving, abby guerra's family has their daughter back, though still in critical condition. >> it's a miracle. but in the same you feel angry. because we've mourned all week.
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>> reporter: marlena cantu's family is just beginning to mourn. even though she has been dead for a week. david wright, abc news, washington. >> when i heard that story the thing that struck me the most is how are cantu's parents bedside and not recognizing that this was not their daughter? the answer is even sadder in that the injuries are so severe, brain injuries and back injuries so severe you can't even recognize your own daughter's face. it's just so beyond the scope of what most of us could imagine. >> no, especially as a parent to see your child in that kind of condition, i can't imagine how heartbreaking that is for both families. it's a double tragedy here. six days after the accident is when they got identified. this is a horrible story n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n
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n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n
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now to the bottom line in the business of babies' bottoms. the diaper business is actually a $7 billion industry. >> with so much money at stake it is very competitive. sharyn alfonsi takes you behind the scenes at pampers. >> reporter: they are sweet.
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innocent. and at the center of one of the toughest battles in business. the diaper wars. in the u.s., the birth rate has been declining for more than a decade. with fewer new customers, the two industry giants -- pampers and huggies -- are socking it out. fighting for the precious dollars that come with diapering those precious bottoms. americans spend $7 billion worth of diapers every year. $7 billion. and the battle for those dollars has been raging for decades. >> this little baby went to market and smiled all the way home. >> reporter: this is the first diaper commercial from pampers back in 1960. >> because pampers are made with seven layers of softness.
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>> reporter: today, diapers are about half as bulky. that didn't happen by accident. diaper companies spend millions of dollars every year to try to make diapers thinner, more absorbent. we were granted access to pampers' never before seen research and development center. where over 500 scientists, chemical engineers, and seamstresses are trying to improve the look and the feel of the nappy. >> okay, i can't even say that. >> that's the analytical chromatography lab. >> okay. >> reporter: their work is surprisingly top secret. no one, not even executives like terry halley, have access to every room. here, they're working on prototypes for new diapers. they are tested for scent, touch, flexibility, and durability. >> we want to make sure that as babies, they're scooting around on their bottom, and moving, that that product stays together and stays as intended the entire wear time. >> 23.4 pounds. >> yeah! >> good boy. >> good job!
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>> reporter: and that's before they bring in the babies for realtime testing. this is called a fit and load test. >> hang on tight. >> reporter: fit to make sure they're comfortable. and then the load. >> tickle? >> reporter: those bubbles are synthetic urine. each diaper is tested for how much it can take before it leaks. which is why when dozens of mothers complained on facebook about pampers new dry max diapers, saying they gave their children extreme diaper rash and chemical burns, the folks at pampers were shocked. >> there's been no data being able to link the dry max product to any kind of skin irritation. dry max was tested on over 20,000 babies. >> reporter: the internet swirled with theories. that pampers competitors or environmentalists, who favor cloth diapers, were behind some of the accusations.
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and while that battle raged on, the diaper war intensified. huggies launching a little shock and awe. ♪ my diaper is full ♪ ♪ full of fashion ♪ >> reporter: a limited edition jean diaper. yes, jean diaper. ♪ i look like number one ♪ ♪ i poo in blue ♪ >> reporter: the commercial caused quite a buzz. >> over 1 million consumers have actually gone on to youtube where the spot is actually out there and played the commercial for themselves. >> reporter: and sales skyrocketed, up 15% almost overnight. but pampers fought back. releasing its cynthia rowley designer diapers. seems silly? the idea is to get moms so excited about a new product, they'll switch brands. and that is not easy. diaper buyers are extremely brand loyal. and it starts on day one. studies show if a mother is given a particular brand in the hospital, they're likely to use
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that brand for life. so both companies sell their diapers to hospitals at a discount hoping to hook customers early. pampers claims it now has contracts with about 95% of hospitals. to win the diaper war, companies know they have to win the hearts and minds of mommies. after all, there are billions of dollars riding on this adorable bottom lines. i'm sharyn alfonsi in new york. >> you can't tell me that jeans diaper commercial is not the funniest thing you've seen in a long time. >> the tag line for that when they first launched them, and they're available through the end of this month, the coolest you'll look pooping in your pants.
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pm your #1 choice. finally this half hour, a medical milestone that has given one man a new outlook on life. he was given the world's first full-face transplant. >> incredible story here. five years ago he was accidentally shot in the face. now he's showing the world his new look. here's the bbc's fergus walsh. >> reporter: his new face is still swollen and he has yet to regain full muscle control. but for the man known only as oscar, this is a dramatic improvement.
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five years ago, the 31-year-old farmer accidentally shot himself in the face. he'd been unable to breathe or swallow. now, he's beginning to learn how to talk again. "i would like to thank all the medical team," oscar said, "the donor's family, and above all, my relatives, for supporting me until the end." the operation in march lasted 24 hours. from a donor, on the left, doctors at a hospital in barcelona removed the entire face and muscles, plus the jaw, nose, cheekbones, teeth, and eyelids. along with a network of nerves and blood vessels. it was the most extensive face transplant ever carried out. doctors said oscar will need more than a year of physical therapy and should regain 90% of his facial functions. his sister said he just wanted to be normal. >> translator: a life like he had before.
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the simple fact of being able to go down the street without people looking at him in a strange way. we could have a family meal. we can all be together. >> reporter: frenchwoman isabelle dinoire was the first person to receive a partial face transplant five years ago. since then, ten more patients worldwide have received new faces. all with the ambitions of returning to a normal life. fergus walsh, bbc news. >> unbelievable. >> it really is. they're saying the good news is a week after the operation he had to shave because his beard was actually growing. they mentioned isabelle dinoire. i think when you saw her face you probably remember her. if we have a picture we're going to show you. this is what she looked like on the left right after the surgery. she looks fantastic now. >> she healed really nice. modern medicine blows my mind,
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especially with this kind of stuff. look at, tha
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